RMLV: Measuring Liquor

Compliance with the Trade Measurement Act 1990 will ensure that the correct and approved measuring instruments are used for selling beer and certain prescribed spirits, and that consumers do not receive short-measure.

According to the Trade Measurement (Miscellaneous) Regulation 1991, licensees and approved managers must ensure that the following alcoholic beverages are measured under the category of:

  • Brandy (including Armagnac and cognac)
  • Gin
  • Rum
  • Vodka
  • Whisky (whiskey)
  • Draught beer, stout and ale

For these beverages, licensees should be using a measuring instrument which:

  • Is an approved type
  • Has a known marked volume
  • Has been tested for accuracy

Beer

The volume of a beer glass is either measured to the brim of the glass or to a marked line on the glass. Most glasses used in Australia are measured to the brim. Although glasses can be of any capacity, the most common are 140ml, 200ml, 285ml, 340ml and 425ml.The capacity of a beer jug must be defined by a line (e.g. 1140ml) but it can also be of any capacity.

Tested and approved glasses or jugs can be easily identified because they are marked on the base or side with:

  • The capacity in millilitres (ml)
  • The approved mark in the form of a stylised scale

Spirits

Spirits should be measured by either electronic/mechanical instruments (dispensers) or simple 15/30mL beverage measures (nip pourers or jiggers) which have been approved, tested and marked accordingly.

An electronic/mechanical measuring instrument must be marked with:

  • A National Standards Commission (NSC) approval number
  • The capacity in millilitres (ml)
  • A certifying mark

A simple beverage measure (nip pourer/jigger) must be made of a rigid material (e.g. stainless steel or polycarbonate) and must be marked with:

  • The capacity in millilitres (ml)
  • The approved mark in the form of a stylised scale

All measuring instruments must be in a capacity of either, 15ml, 30ml or 60ml. These requirements continue to apply when the prescribed spirits are mixed with soft drinks or other general type mixers. However, they don‘t apply when the prescribed spirits are mixed with other spirits or liquors to produce cocktails.